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Healthy Skepticism Announcements

Symposium: To Do No Harm, Toronto, 29 November 2010

The UBC Pharmaceutical Policy Research Collaboration together with researchers from an international study on Pharmaceutical Sales Representatives and Patient Safety present a symposium:
To Do No Harm
Regulation of pharmaceutical promotion and protection of patient health
WHEN: Monday, November 29, 2010 from 9 am to 5 pm
WHERE: Four Seasons Hotel, 21 Avenue Road, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

 

PROGRAM:

Introduction and welcome
• Colleen Flood, Scientific Director, CIHR Institute of Health Services and Policy Research

Panel discussion: Overview on drug promotion and its regulation
• Marc‐André Gagnon, Professor, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario
• Joel Lexchin, Professor, York University, Toronto, Ontario
• Line Guénette, Conseil du Médicament, Quebec

Panel discussion: Drug promotion regulation in three countries
• David K Lee, Director, Office of Legislative and Regulatory Modernization, Health Canada
• Sangeeta Vaswani, Team Leader, Div. of Drug Marketing, Advertising & Communication, FDA, USA
• Alexandre Biosse Duplan, Chef de projet, Haute autorité de santé, Paris, France

Presentation of study results: Pharmaceutical sales representatives and patient safety
• Barbara Mintzes, Assistant Professor, UBC, Vancouver, BC

Panel discussion: Independent medicines information and public safety
• James Wright, Managing Director, Therapeutics Initiative, UBC, Vancouver, BC
• Florence Vandevelde, La revue Prescrire, Paris, France
• Lisa Bero, Professor, University of California‐San Francisco, California, USA

Panel discussion: Broader implications for professional practice
• Adriane Fugh‐Berman, Associate professor, Georgetown University, Washington, DC, USA
• Russell Williams, President and CEO, Rx&D Canada, Ottawa, Ontario
• Mitchell Levine, Director, Centre for Evaluation of Medicines, McMaster U, Hamilton, Ontario

Lunch provided.

Registration fees:
Private Industry Delegate $395
Public‐sector and Non‐profit Delegate $195
Student $50 (only a small number of spaces set aside for students)
Register early ‐ Registration is limited to 75 participants and will be on a first‐come, first‐served basis.

For more information and to register online, see Upcoming Events at: www.pharmaceuticalpolicy.ca/
Contact: Research Coordinator Ellen Reynolds at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) or phone +1.778.430‐2180

 

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...to influence multinational corporations effectively, the efforts of governments will have to be complemented by others, notably the many voluntary organisations that have shown they can effectively represent society’s public-health interests…
A small group known as Healthy Skepticism; formerly the Medical Lobby for Appropriate Marketing) has consistently and insistently drawn the attention of producers to promotional malpractice, calling for (and often securing) correction. These organisations [Healthy Skepticism, Médecins Sans Frontières and Health Action International] are small, but they are capable; they bear malice towards no one, and they are inscrutably honest. If industry is indeed persuaded to face up to its social responsibilities in the coming years it may well be because of these associations and others like them.
- Dukes MN. Accountability of the pharmaceutical industry. Lancet. 2002 Nov 23; 360(9346)1682-4.