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Healthy Skepticism Updates

Update 2007-11-18

New Gallery
Healthy Skepticism's new Gallery is now avalaible for viewing at: www.healthyskepticism.org/gallery
This is a good place to share picture, video, audio and presentation files relevant to drug promotion.

If you would like to post a file, please contact: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)


New Videos:
A new epidemic
Having trouble getting out of bed in the morning....feeling unmotivated at work? You may have Motivational Deficiency Disorder. A short video about this new epidemic by investigative journalist Miranda Burne is now available to all in the Documentaries section of our Gallery at this link.

Pharma insider
PharmedOut have posted two videos on YouTube of Douglas Melnick, a former pharma insider, telling Adriane Fugh-Berman about drug promotion techniques. See: Pharma Insider Part 1 and Pharma Insider Part 2


HS International News: The dilemma for young doctors created by pharma funding of education
In the September 2007 issue Portuguese GP registrar, Tiago Villanueva, discusses the difficult dilemma for young doctors created when the government does not fund education adequately but they can access education funded by industry. See: Pharma money: the least common denominator

In the October issue young Australian GP academic Geoff Spurling expresses different views about that dilemma. See: A response to Tiago Villanueva


Consumers International's Marketing Overdose campaign
Marketing Overdose is a new campaign organised by Consumers International.
The aim is to expose examples of irresponsible drug marketing and campaign for effective rules and regulations to ensure doctors and the public have access to independent, accurate and up-to-date information.

The campaign website has a report titled Drugs, doctors and dinners (1.5 Mb pdf file) highlighting irresponsible drug marketing to doctors in developing countries. This report is based on a larger report produced for Consumers International by Healthy Skepticism.


HS management group re-elected
At our Annual General Meeting on 1 November our management group was re-elected unopposed:
The management group is:
Dr Heather Carter (General practice) Adelaide, Australia
A/Prof Jon Jureidini (Child psychiatry) Adelaide, Australia
Prof Joel Lexchin (Emergency Medicine and Health Policy) Toronto, Canada
Dr Dee Mangin (General Practice) Christchurch, New Zealand
Dr Peter Mansfield (General practice) Willunga, Australia
Ms Joana Ramos (Social Work and Health Policy) Seattle, USA
Ms Melissa Raven (Public Health) Adelaide, Australia
Mr Jörg Schaaber (Sociology and Journalism) Bielefeld, Germany
Dr Agnés Vitry (Pharmacy) Adelaide, Australia
 

 

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Next Update: Update 2008-03-16

Previous Update: Update 2007-08-22

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Cases of wilful misrepresentation are a rarity in medical advertising. For every advertisement in which nonexistent doctors are called on to testify or deliberately irrelevant references are bunched up in [fine print], you will find a hundred or more whose greatest offenses are unquestioning enthusiasm and the skill to communicate it.

The best defence the physician can muster against this kind of advertising is a healthy skepticism and a willingness, not always apparent in the past, to do his homework. He must cultivate a flair for spotting the logical loophole, the invalid clinical trial, the unreliable or meaningless testimonial, the unneeded improvement and the unlikely claim. Above all, he must develop greater resistance to the lure of the fashionable and the new.
- Pierre R. Garai (advertising executive) 1963