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Healthy Skepticism Library item: 3994

Warning: This library includes all items relevant to health product marketing that we are aware of regardless of quality. Often we do not agree with all or part of the contents.

 

Publication type: Journal Article

Prescriptions for profit
1989 Mar 28;


Abstract:

The show looks at promotion techniques of pharmaceutical companies such as celebrity endorsements, running disease oriented television commercials and flying doctors to resorts for meetings. It looks at the way that Eli Lilly promoted Oraflex (benoxaprofen) and the way that McNeil promoted Zomax (zomepirac) including how McNeil reacted when it heard about side effects from Zomax and what it told its sales representatives to say and not say. It also examines the relationship between drug companies and doctors who do research for them and act as paid consultants.

Keywords:
*analysis/United States/Eli Lilly/ Opren and Oraflex/ McNeil/ drug company sponsored research/ drug company sponsored meals and travel/Zomax/Ciba-Geigy/Voltaren/ endorsements/ relationship between researchers, academic institutions and industry/ broadcast advertisements/ DTCA/ direct-to-consumer advertising/ sales representatives/ nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs/ NSAID/ATTITUDES REGARDING PROMOTION: CONSUMERS/PATIENTS/ETHICAL ISSUES IN PROMOTION: LINKS BETWEEN HEALTH PROFESSIONALS AND INDUSTRY/ETHICAL ISSUES IN PROMOTION: PAYMENT FOR MEALS, ACCOMODATION, TRAVEL, ENTERTAINMENT/EVALUATION OF PROMOTION: DETAILING/EVALUATION OF PROMOTION: DIRECT-TO-CONSUMER ADVERTISING/INFLUENCE OF PROMOTION: CONFERENCE SPEAKERS/INFLUENCE OF PROMOTION: PRESCRIBING, DRUG USE/PROMOTION BY THIRD PARTIES: HEALTH

 

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There is no sin in being wrong. The sin is in our unwillingness to examine our own beliefs, and in believing that our authorities cannot be wrong. Far from creating cynics, such a story is likely to foster a healthy and creative skepticism, which is something quite different from cynicism.”
- Neil Postman in The End of Education