corner
Healthy Skepticism
Join us to help reduce harm from misleading health information.
Increase font size   Decrease font size   Print-friendly view   Print
Register Log in

Healthy Skepticism Library item: 3926

Warning: This library includes all items relevant to health product marketing that we are aware of regardless of quality. Often we do not agree with all or part of the contents.

 

Publication type: media release

Henry D, Moynihan R.
Inaugural Conference on Disease-Mongering
diseasemongering.org 2006 Apr 11
http://www.diseasemongering.org/


Notes:

Ralph Faggotter’s Comments:

The world’s first international conference on Disease-Mongering has started today in Newcastle Australia!!

This conference should prove to be an eye-opener to many in the journalistic and medical professions.


Full text:

Welcome

The conference will be held at the

David Maddison Building
Royal Newcastle Hospital
Pacific Street
Newcastle NSW 2300
Invitation

It is a great pleasure to invite you to the inaugural Conference on Disease-Mongering to be held in Newcastle New South Wales, Australia on April 11th to 13th 2006.

The conference will bring together academics, researchers, health professionals, health managers, journalists, writers and consumers who share an interest and concern over the trend to corporate definitions of diseases with a primary interest in making profits rather than a concern for the public health.

The Conference will feature speakers who are internationally recognized in this field. We are also inviting free papers on any topic related to disease-mongering and medicalisation.

The conference will be organized around a mixture of plenary, parallel and small group sessions. The aims of the conference are to review a range of examples of disease-mongering, to develop a common view on the character and magnitude of the problems created by disease-mongering, to develop some position statements and a research agenda that will hopefully lead to collaborative projects

Professor David Henry
Physician
School of Medical Practice and Public Health
The University of Newcastle, NSW

Ray Moynihan
Journalist and Writer
School of Medical Practice and Public Health
The University of Newcastle, NSW
Key Dates
Early Registration Deadline: 24 February 2006
Abstract Submission Deadline: 1 March 2006
News
Conference starts this morning a DVD will be available
11 Apr 2006

We are making a DVD of the conference proceedings which will include a short mockumentary on motivational deficiency disorder. The cost will be $33 AUD including GST. If you are interested in obtaining a copy send an email to David.Henry@newcastle.edu.au
Day Registration available now
06 Apr 2006

Registration fees are $200 for April 11th $200 for April 12th and $150 for April 13th. If you are interested call Conexion the conference managers on 02 9518 7722
Abstracts now available
24 Mar 2006

The abstracts for several of the presentations to the Conference are now available by following the link on the rights hand side of the home page. This file will be updated over the next few days.
Final Program now available
13 Mar 2006

The program commences on 10:00 AM on Tues April 11th 2006 and the conference ends at 1:00 pm on Thurs April 13th 2006. Full details of session and presentation times and presenters are now available. Follow the program button on the panel to the right and download the pdf file. Please direct any enquiries to David.Henry@newcastle.edu.au

Program

The program is available for download. This file requires the Adobe Acrobat Reader.
A Provocative Symposium on the Selling of Sickness

The ascendancy of market logic has both expanded and legitimised the commercialisation of medicine. In the pharmaceutical sector, competitive enterprise dominates not only the development of drugs -and increasingly their diffusion – but also the very definitions of the illnesses they are used to treat.

Industry capacity for innovation, essential for sustaining high profitability, has arguably extended beyond the invention of novel products to the creation of new illnesses, disorders and dysfunction, and the expansion of old ones. Using informal alliances with physician and patient groups, and with the assistance of public relations experts, drug companies now ‘brand’ conditions just as they brand medicines.

Contentiously characterised as ‘disease-mongering’ by the late Lynn Payer many marketing strategies appear to be about selling sickness in order to sell drugs. Examples of disorders that have been represented in this way are as diverse as male and female erectile dysfunction, social anxiety disorder, alopecia, and irritable bowl. No-one questions that some individuals suffering from these ‘conditions’ experience genuine morbidity. The ‘disorders’ are also difficult to define and quantify, tend to be chronic and in some cases seem to represent normal human variation or the predictable but undesired effects of ageing.

In the lead up to this global symposium we are commissioning a series of thoughtful academic and accessible discussion papers that will assay the role of marketing in contemporary medical practice, and attempt to understand and challenge the phenomenon of disease-mongering.

The conference will be organized around a mixture of plenary, parallel and small group sessions. The aims of the conference are to review a range of examples of disease-mongering, to develop a common view on the character and magnitude of the problems created by disease-mongering, to develop some position statements and a research agenda that will lead to collaborative projects.
Themes

1. A taxonomy of disease-mongering; understanding through classification 2. A contemporary case study: the selling of bi-polar disorder 3. Nothing new under the sun- a historical perspective on the selling of sickness- from medicalisation to disease-mongering 4. The psychology of disease-mongering- do disease-awareness campaigns make some people sick? 5. The role of health professionals – is this about power or money? 6. The role of patient groups- genuine advocacy or corporate allies? 7. The role of the spin industry- exposing and confronting the silent mind-changers in global PR 8. The role of the media – what role does media play in disease-mongering, and how might that change? 9. The role of government – how might disease-mongering be regulated? 10. Independent disease-definition strategies- what are the alternatives to the current model of entangled panels constantly expanding disease definitions?

Invited Speakers
Invited speakers include

* Joe Collier (UK) * Joel Lexchin (Canada) * David Healy (UK) * Steve Woloshin (USA) * Lisa Schwartz (USA) * Leonore Tiefer (USA) * Barbara Mintzes (Canada) * Iona Heath (UK) * Ray Moynihan (Australia) * Ian Kerridge (Australia) * David Henry (Australia)

 

  Healthy Skepticism on RSS   Healthy Skepticism on Facebook   Healthy Skepticism on Twitter

Please
Click to Register

(read more)

then
Click to Log in
for free access to more features of this website.

Forgot your username or password?

You are invited to
apply for membership
of Healthy Skepticism,
if you support our aims.

Pay a subscription

Support our work with a donation

Buy Healthy Skepticism T Shirts


If there is something you don't like, please tell us. If you like our work, please tell others.

Email a Friend








Cases of wilful misrepresentation are a rarity in medical advertising. For every advertisement in which nonexistent doctors are called on to testify or deliberately irrelevant references are bunched up in [fine print], you will find a hundred or more whose greatest offenses are unquestioning enthusiasm and the skill to communicate it.

The best defence the physician can muster against this kind of advertising is a healthy skepticism and a willingness, not always apparent in the past, to do his homework. He must cultivate a flair for spotting the logical loophole, the invalid clinical trial, the unreliable or meaningless testimonial, the unneeded improvement and the unlikely claim. Above all, he must develop greater resistance to the lure of the fashionable and the new.
- Pierre R. Garai (advertising executive) 1963