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Healthy Skepticism Library item: 20411

Warning: This library includes all items relevant to health product marketing that we are aware of regardless of quality. Often we do not agree with all or part of the contents.

 

Publication type: Journal Article

Webster DM, Kruglanski AW.
Individual differences in need for cognitive closure.
J Pers Soc Psychol 1994; 67:(6):1049-62
http://psycnet.apa.org/journals/psp/67/6/1049/


Abstract:

This article introduces an individual-difference measure of the need for cognitive closure. As a dispositional construct, the need for cognitive closure is presently treated as a latent variable manifested through several different aspects, namely, desire for predictability, preference for order and structure, discomfort with ambiguity, decisiveness, and close-mindedness. This article presents psychometric work on the measure as well as several validation studies including (a) a “known-groups” discrimination between populations assumed to differ in their need for closure, (b) discriminant and convergent validation with respect to related personality measures, and © replication of effects obtained with situational inductions of the need for closure. The present findings suggest that the Need for Closure Scale is a reliable and valid instrument of considerable potential utility in future “motivated social cognition” research.

Keywords:
Cognition* Female Humans Interpersonal Relations Male Social Behavior*

 

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There is no sin in being wrong. The sin is in our unwillingness to examine our own beliefs, and in believing that our authorities cannot be wrong. Far from creating cynics, such a story is likely to foster a healthy and creative skepticism, which is something quite different from cynicism.”
- Neil Postman in The End of Education