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Healthy Skepticism Library item: 19697

Warning: This library includes all items relevant to health product marketing that we are aware of regardless of quality. Often we do not agree with all or part of the contents.

 

Publication type: news

Matwankar A
Maharashtra FDA to act against advertisements on drugs and medical devices
Pharmabiz 2011 Nov 25
http://www.pharmabiz.com/NewsDetails.aspx?aid=66212&sid=1


Full text:

The Maharashtra Food and Drugs Administration (FDA) has started sensitising the gullible people about the dangers of purchasing medicines and medical devices under the influence of advertisements, in violation of the Drugs and Magic Remedies (Objectionable Advertisements) Act 1954.

According to the FDA authorities, medicines and medical devices should be purchased under the strict supervision of the doctors or physicians otherwise it can be dangerous to life.

Mahesh Zhagade, commissioner of FDA informed that Drugs and Magic Remedies (Objectionable Advertisements) Act, 1954 was implemented to prohibit the advertisements made through print, electronic, hoardings, in trains and on buses. He said, “People should not purchase such medicine just by seeing through the advertisements made in such mediums as there will be severe side effects and we are also advising people to take medicines after taking permission of their doctor or physician, because in some cases the side effects are seen after 10 or 12 years.”

The Act specifies that no person or company can advertise about a drug that is used for the treatment of sexual impotence, among other medical disorders, unless prescribed by registered medical practitioners.

Offenders can be punished either with imprisonment extended to six months, a fine, or both for a first-time conviction. It may extend to a one-year imprisonment or with a fine or both on subsequent convictions.

He further added, “We came across many drug samples which are manufactured in the state or outside state or some are imported are being advertised here in local newspapers which is a very serious matter and we are going to investigate this whole issue and soon the actions will be taken by the department across the state.”

According to Drugs and Magic Remedies (Objectionable Advertisement) Act 1954, any ‘advertisement’ includes any notice, circular, label, wrapper, or other document, and any announcement made orally or by any means of producing or transmitting light, sound or smoke.

 

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...to influence multinational corporations effectively, the efforts of governments will have to be complemented by others, notably the many voluntary organisations that have shown they can effectively represent society’s public-health interests…
A small group known as Healthy Skepticism; formerly the Medical Lobby for Appropriate Marketing) has consistently and insistently drawn the attention of producers to promotional malpractice, calling for (and often securing) correction. These organisations [Healthy Skepticism, Médecins Sans Frontières and Health Action International] are small, but they are capable; they bear malice towards no one, and they are inscrutably honest. If industry is indeed persuaded to face up to its social responsibilities in the coming years it may well be because of these associations and others like them.
- Dukes MN. Accountability of the pharmaceutical industry. Lancet. 2002 Nov 23; 360(9346)1682-4.