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Healthy Skepticism Library item: 19589

Warning: This library includes all items relevant to health product marketing that we are aware of regardless of quality. Often we do not agree with all or part of the contents.

 

Publication type: Journal Article

Lai NM, Teng CL
Self-perceived competence correlates poorly with objectively measured competence in Evidence Based Medicine among medical students
BMC Medical Education 2011 May 28; 11:(25):
http://www.biomedcentral.com/1472-6920/11/25/abstract


Abstract:

Background
Previous studies report various degrees of agreement between self-perceived competence and objectively measured competence in medical students. There is still a paucity of evidence on how the two correlate in the field of Evidence Based Medicine (EBM). We undertook a cross-sectional study to evaluate the self-perceived competence in EBM of senior medical students in Malaysia, and assessed its correlation to their objectively measured competence in EBM.

Methods
We recruited a group of medical students in their final six months of training between March and August 2006. The students were receiving a clinically-integrated EBM training program within their curriculum. We evaluated the students’ self-perceived competence in two EBM domains (“searching for evidence” and “appraising the evidence”) by piloting a questionnaire containing 16 relevant items, and objectively assessed their competence in EBM using an adapted version of the Fresno test, a validated tool. We correlated the matching components between our questionnaire and the Fresno test using Pearson’s product-moment correlation.

Results
Forty-five out of 72 students in the cohort (62.5%) participated by completing the questionnaire and the adapted Fresno test concurrently. In general, our students perceived themselves as moderately competent in most items of the questionnaire. They rated themselves on average 6.34 out of 10 (63.4%) in “searching” and 44.41 out of 57 (77.9%) in “appraising”. They scored on average 26.15 out of 60 (43.6%) in the “searching” domain and 57.02 out of 116 (49.2%) in the “appraising” domain in the Fresno test. The correlations between the students’ self-rating and their performance in the Fresno test were poor in both the “searching” domain (r=0.13, p=0.4) and the “appraising” domain (r=0.24, p=0.1).

Conclusions
This study provides supporting evidence that at the undergraduate level, self-perceived competence in EBM, as measured using our questionnaire, does not correlate well with objectively assessed EBM competence measured using the adapted Fresno test. Study registration International Medical University, Malaysia, research ID: IMU 110/06

 

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Cases of wilful misrepresentation are a rarity in medical advertising. For every advertisement in which nonexistent doctors are called on to testify or deliberately irrelevant references are bunched up in [fine print], you will find a hundred or more whose greatest offenses are unquestioning enthusiasm and the skill to communicate it.

The best defence the physician can muster against this kind of advertising is a healthy skepticism and a willingness, not always apparent in the past, to do his homework. He must cultivate a flair for spotting the logical loophole, the invalid clinical trial, the unreliable or meaningless testimonial, the unneeded improvement and the unlikely claim. Above all, he must develop greater resistance to the lure of the fashionable and the new.
- Pierre R. Garai (advertising executive) 1963